You Are Here: ://CDR
  • Beirt (Irish/Gaelic for twosome) is the debut album of young (15 & 13) brothers Dante and Eros Faulk, a cello/fiddle folk duo from Olympia, Washington. Both classically trained, the brothers now focus exclusively on a variety of folk and traditional styles of music, ranging from Celtic (Irish, Scottish, Cape Breton), Scandinavian, Quebecoise, to Old Time, Bluegrass and modern day fiddle tunes.
  • Tom Dyer - Songs To Annoy Small Children
    Songs To Annoy Small Children is the latest bit of nonsense from the indefatigable Tom Dyer. This project began life in 1995 without a long-range plan. These were simple, made-up songs to be sung to his long-suffering children. The first was Bathtub Plug, an ode to a replacement plug in a claw foot bathtub. There were five songs total. Three were recorded, including the embarrassing Dyer Family Song.  In December 2016, Dyer decided to complete the song cycle and recorded, in two days, the final two (including the masterpiece There’s A Great Glowing Gasbag In The Sky, It’s Called The Sun) plus a new concluding composition, They’re Old. To add depth and muscle to this remarkable and irreverent artifact, two additional works are being presented herein. First, are the Pirate Songs of Cap’n Kat and the SS Mediocrity. Recorded in 2005 at the zenith of the Johnny Depp pirate mania, these songs a) reflect on health issues encountered by knaves on the high seas and b) inventory the means needed for career success. The songs were composed and performed by Kat and Ben Dyer, who have most recently released material as The Dyer Spawn on GMR’s 2016 Xmas album. Second, we have five songs by Susan Dyer, composed for and performed as part of the pantomime Aladdin & His Magic Lamp in 2002. This cast recording exists because Tom was on the East Coast and could not attend the play. He retained audio engineers to do a live studio recording of the entire performance. These were Ms. Dyer’s first featured compositions; she doubles as a performer in the role of Queen Dragona.    
  • Slam Suzzanne
    “every scene has that one genius band that never gets beyond headlining local festivals and gigs, and Slam Suzzanne appears to have been one of Seattle’s better punk bands. Never too late to check ‘em out, my friends…” The Recoup Rock*Roll Experience Bob Suehs says: This record is a re-release and the music is straight up metal with a touch o’ punk infused. “No Food” has a guitar riff that’s a straight up Black Sabbath rip off but the tone isn’t as thick as Sabbath. In the bands defense what metal guitar riff isn’t a slight rip off of Black Sabbath in some way? Loud, fast & always cracking jokes, Slam Suzzanne were a band who’s music was created with a sense of humor ala Mucky Pup & Psychostick. It’s a shame this band never went further than they did because they wrote some goofy yet catchy songs & when they sing “It hurts when I pee” in “Perforated Condom” you realize the genius in this band *sic* .
  • The Hitmen - Smashface

    The Hitmen – Smashface

    $9.00$12.99
    "Smashface mixes an eclectic batch of influences into an infectious set of songs that will alternatively have you shaking your head and singing along. Guitarist/songwriter Joe Leonard is the driving force here – his bottomless bag of guitar tones and techniques alludes to everybody from Andy Gill and Will Sergeant to Jimmy Nolan and Eddie Van Halen, sometimes all at once, and his colorful synth excursions further fill out the bands varied sound. Singer/songwriter Mark Palmer manages to keep up with solid rhythm guitar chops and an endearingly nerdy voice that sits comfortably amid the melodic chaos. Echoes of power pop (“Medicine Hat,” “Perfect Pain,” “Ice Age”), soulful balladry (“This Must Be the Place”), funk (“Cold War”), saloon crooning (“My Love Ran Out”) and, er, heavy metal/ska/psych/pop (“Thrasher’s Corner”) keep the record eclectic, but the band’s consistent writing and appealing personality tie everything together with common threads.  Spin Smashface and become the first member of the new cult of the Hitmen." Michael Toland - The Big Takeover
  • The Icons - Masters of Disaster
    "there are lots of young musicians trying to capture this kind of guitar-driven spike-pop sound and not doing it nearly as well. With Dyer reactivating the Icons, at least as a recording unit, now is the time to give these Masters of Disaster their long overdue props. "Michael Toland - The Big Takeover "The Icons have somehow conjured up a mixture of the sixties and the eighties (the Seattle pop rock eighties) and remastered it for the present. No mosh pit for these guys, though on some songs they deserve one." Frank Gutch Jr. - Rock and Reprise "Masters Of Disaster (Green Monkey) is an album that represents the Seattle sound circa 1985, and I don’t mean a body of water either. Their sound was a mixture of new wave with a hint of gothic overtones, punk but not overly punk, but with an attitude and hint of sarcasm that has become one of the region’s greatest trademarks." John Book
  • Tom Dyer - Songs From Academia Vol. 2
    I’m thankful that this exists. I’m not sure having a world full of Tom Dyer copycats would be a good one, which is my way of saying he is one of a kind, representing what Seattle music is all about, period. John Book Vol. 1 is pretty sweet, full of quirky rock/pop songs from a variety of projects – the band BEAUTIMUS deserves its own anthology. Vol. 2 is wordless more often than not, with a jazzy/folky/psychedelic/experimental smorgasbord of shapes, scents and colors, including an electronic interpretation of a painting. Not as accessible as Vol. 1, perhaps, but just as entertaining if you give it a chance. Michael Toland - The Big Takeover
  • Tom Dyer - Songs From Academia Vol. 1
    "Songs from Academia... is an intriguing listen, to say the least, the collection providing an intimate look at Dyer's free-wheeling, at times deeply experimental muse." Fred Mills - Blurt "Opening with the Gong-like "The Prize," the album flits between the afore-mentioned dates, taking in the synth-pop of "Little Sally Walker," the quirky electro-pop of "(Half The World Is Made Of) Women" with its grin-inducing lyrics, and the even quirkier "The Question Asked," which - dated 2007 - is an indication of how much this musician's style has changed since the early 'eighties; great production on this track. "I See Pictures" has a strong UK post-punk vibe to it, while "She's Winning The War For Daddy" is half show-tune, half brash pop-tune. "The Stars" and "The Sky" are very recent, the former a thumping rocker, the latter a bizarre electro-stomper, while the concluding track, also recent, also showcases Dyer's skill at putting together poptastic riffola. Great stuff - proper singing and playing, and another volume to come." Terrascope "Songs is a personal diary of one man’s journey towards creating sounds which simply suited him, as most of these have not been heard by anyone but his closest friends. Some of them have not been heard by anyone but by its creator, so consider it a lucky chance to listen to the talent of someone who’s goal is to simply create for the sake of being creative. "John Book